$20.00
Print (Poster / Rag / Torchon) Dimensions Wall Cling Dimensions
Small 22.0" x 16.5" Small 24.0" x 18.0"
Medium 29.5" x 22.0" Medium 32.5" x 24.0"
Large 46.0" x 34.0" Large 48.5" x 36.0"
Tapestry Canvas
Small 18.0" x 13.5" Small 18.0" x 13.5"
Medium 24.0" x 18.0" Medium 24.5" x 18.0"
Large 36.0" x 26.5" Large 40.5" x 30.0"

Yucca

Stomping Grounds

$20.00
Regular price $20.00
Yucca bailey i Wooton and Standley 

The genus Yucca belongs to the Lily Family and contains many 
species native in North and Central America. The roots, when rubbed 
in water, give a thick suds, and they are often used as a substitute for 
soap in washing clothes, especially by the native people of the South- 
west. The Amole, as the root is called by the Mexicans, is very effi- 
cacious in cleaning fabrics, or when used in bathing or as a shampoo, 
leaving the skin smooth and the hair soft and glossy. The names soap- 
root and Spanish dagger or Spanish bayonet are applied to the yuc- 
cas in the United States. 

When driving in June from Gallup, New Mexico, to Zufii, I found 
this beautiful yucca coming into bloom in many places along the edge 
of the sparse pinyon or nut pine forests. The sturdy spikes of large, 
pale green flowers, tinged on the sepals with purple, grew from two 
to three feet in height. They rose from a bristling clump of relatively 
short, narrow, sharp-pointed green leaves, furnished along their bor- 
ders with stiff, coarse, threadlike fibers. 

This yucca, which was named for Vernon Bailey, of the U. S. Bio- 
logical Survey, has a narrow range in northwestern New Mexico and 
northeastern Arizona.
We produce all of our on images in shop, and we are happy to offer custom work to our customers. Please inquire for pricing and options.
Yucca bailey i Wooton and Standley 

The genus Yucca belongs to the Lily Family and contains many 
species native in North and Central America. The roots, when rubbed 
in water, give a thick suds, and they are often used as a substitute for 
soap in washing clothes, especially by the native people of the South- 
west. The Amole, as the root is called by the Mexicans, is very effi- 
cacious in cleaning fabrics, or when used in bathing or as a shampoo, 
leaving the skin smooth and the hair soft and glossy. The names soap- 
root and Spanish dagger or Spanish bayonet are applied to the yuc- 
cas in the United States. 

When driving in June from Gallup, New Mexico, to Zufii, I found 
this beautiful yucca coming into bloom in many places along the edge 
of the sparse pinyon or nut pine forests. The sturdy spikes of large, 
pale green flowers, tinged on the sepals with purple, grew from two 
to three feet in height. They rose from a bristling clump of relatively 
short, narrow, sharp-pointed green leaves, furnished along their bor- 
ders with stiff, coarse, threadlike fibers. 

This yucca, which was named for Vernon Bailey, of the U. S. Bio- 
logical Survey, has a narrow range in northwestern New Mexico and 
northeastern Arizona.
We produce all of our on images in shop, and we are happy to offer custom work to our customers. Please inquire for pricing and options.